Caroline Comes to Compersia Community

Hi all, I’m Caroline from the community formerly known as the Midden (long story, for another time.) I’ve been visiting Compersia since the Twin Oaks Communities Conference 9/1 – 9/4. TOCC was pretty great even though it rained hurricane rains on us while we camped in the woods. But I built a huge fire in the pit once the rain slowed and everybody got to huddle and dry out and make merry. The theme of the conference was Racial and Social Justice, and a lot of people walked away with a new deeper understanding of the ways that inequality and white supremacy is encoded into the fabric of our society. We learned ways we can be aware of this and begin to dismantle it. During the conference I went to visit Acorn, and got to reconnect with Rejoice, who allowed us 3 city kids to join her to feed and water the cows and goats. We visited and scratched the head of her beloved Cow and Cow’s offspring Trogdor. We fed goats, we trampled through fields of poison ivy, we jumped a fence.

CompLine1a
This is Cow. Yes, that’s her name.

I’m interested to possibly become a member here at Compersia, so I thought I’d swing by and experience life here for a couple days. Hence, they let me take over their blog post. (Muahahaha!!) No, I really only have nice things to say. Except maybe about the dishes. Which I’ve been told bubble up from flat surfaces, and you have to wipe them away into the dishwasher, and 30 minutes later, more will just spontaneously bubble up from random surfaces, only to have you scrape them away, and repeat this pattern ad infinitum, until you die. Luckily, I don’t particularly despise dish duty any more, and so found a way to make myself useful. Another way to be useful? Declare yourself a jungle gym for the children! Definitely popular among the under 4-foot crowd. M, one of the children, and I had a great conversation one evening about the usefulness of typing as a skill. It may sound boring to the outsider, but was actually quite engaging. Typing: it matters.

CompLine2
While divesting objects that are no longer useful to him, GPaul offers me this device that is supposedly a peephole for a front door.  I think it’s a magic spyglass.  Tomato, tomaahto. He is not amused.

On Wednesday, Compersia hosted a rousing concert by David Wax Museum, and oooOOOOEEE, that was good fun. They played guitar, accordion, fiddle, the jaw bone of a donkey, and maybe a ukulele?? I may not know my stringed instruments, but I know a foot-stomping good time when I hear one. 35 people came and listened. The children threw flowers. The adults danced and chair-danced. I, for one, can’t wait to hear their Spanish-language album, the one song they played from it set the room on fire!

CompLine3a
The band David Wax Museum may begin a tour of actual wax museums in 2018.  Stay tuned.  **This may or may not be true.

Thursday afternoon I saw a 10+ point buck (male deer) with a fawn wandering through the back yard, and shouted for everyone to come see. The kids were like, “meh,” and apparently the adults don’t like the deer because they eat the garden. But I was floored because it was a majestic beast.

On Thursday evening, my last night here, I offered an iRest Yoga Nidra session to all interested parties. 4 folks had time and interest, and we covered the living room floor with yoga mats, blankets, pillows, and soft things, and did a deep relaxation session. iRest Yoga Nidra is a research-based transformative practice of deep relaxation and meditative inquiry. It’s currently being utilized in VA hospitals, hospice, homeless shelters, and schools. Research has shown that iRest effectively reduces PTSD, depression, anxiety, insomnia, chronic pain, and chemical dependency while increasing health, resiliency, and well-being. Yay healing! Yay deep relaxation! Yay for the post meditation cuddle puddle!

If you’d like to read more or listen to a 20 or 30 minute pre-recorded session by the psychologist who developed this practice based on Kashmir Shaivism, check it out here: https://www.irest.us/projects/irest

That’s all for now. This commundard is over and out. If you want to learn more about the Midden in Columbus, OH, check out our brand new blog to read about our adventures: http://radicalcooperation.wordpress.com

<3,  Caro—-

AKA Caroline Midden

AKA Imperator Furiosa

Advertisements
Caroline Comes to Compersia Community

Is there space for me at a commune?

By Paxus Calta-Star

People ask regularly if there are spaces for new members at the income sharing communities.  This is a current update on the space availability of the various communes in the US with ways to contact them and relevant guest/intern/visitor policies linked.  This information changes with time, so it’s best to check with any community you wish to visit before scheduling your trip there.

cambia wodden sign

Cambia (Louisa, VA) Yes, there are spaces.  Cambia is actively promoting its sustainable environmental education program and has space for both interns and new members.  This 2016 intern announcement is also current for 2017 and 2018.

Mimosa (Louisa, VA) This reforming new community (formerly Sapling) is interested in new members but is currently working on completing housing to provide space and thus cannot currently accommodate people for more than short visits.  Feel free to send them an email.

rainbows at LEF
Double Rainbow at LEF

Living Energy Farm  (Louisa, VA) does have space for interns but is not seeking new members at this time.  They have completed their main residence and are working on additional spaces for new members.

in , , on Wednesday, May 11, 2016.   Sarah Rice

Acorn (Mineral, VA) is full.  Acorn is not accepting new visitors interested in membership until spring 2018.  Acorn does have possible internships starting in January 2018.

is it utopia yet
Nope, not yet.

Twin Oaks  (Louisa, VA) is near its population cap, and continues to accept people for membership, currently if you were accepted you could join right away, but there is some chance we will return to a waiting list soon.    Twin Oaks does not currently have intern spots available.

burning man image
Skip Burning Man

Twin Oaks also hosts an annual communities conference.  This year it is Sept 1st thru 4th (labor day weekend).  If you are seeking communities, this is a great place to discover a bunch of them at once.  And here are 7 reasons it is a better place to spend your time than Burning Man.

Compersia (Washington DC) has at least one space available in this new, urban, commune located in the Brentwood district of DC.  Compersia has had one intern and might be open to more.

Aviva1
Ganas houses

Ganas  (Staten Island, NY) is looking for new members.   While technically not an income sharing community over all, Ganas is supportive of the Point A project and the expansion of the communes movement.  There are occasionally job openings at Ganas but right now Ganas is looking for paying members.

three farmers east wind
Working the soil at East Wind

East Wind (Tecumseh, MO) is full and has a waiting list, but is still happy to have folks come and visit and like Twin Oaks you can apply for membership and be put on a waiting list.   Because East Wind has a gender imbalance it actually has two waiting lists, one for males and one for females.  There is currently a male waiting list of about half a dozen men.  A woman who was accepted now would be at the top of that waiting list, and after three women are accepted, one of the men can be offered membership from the male waiting list.

midden-energy-efficiency-poster
Midden protest art

The Midden (Columbus, OH) is in transition away from being a commune and towards being a NASCO group house in Columbus.

Sandhill Farm (Rutledge, MO) has space for interns and folks looking for a short visit.

Is there space for me at a commune?

None Dare Call It Tokenism

By Courtney Dowe

What is the difference between tokenism and diversity?

I don’t fucking know.

Wait. Did you think that just because I have access to a computer and the ability to type that I would be able to quickly clear that little question up for you? *tsk tsk*

I’m just asking.

For many, diversity and tokenism are impossible to distinguish from one another, but the seemingly subtle difference between them is the difference between genuine progress and a new version of the same old bullshit.
Token1
The Urban Dictionary does not have a definition for tokenism, but it does have a definition for Token Negro: “A Black person whose interests and actions are profoundly non-threatening to whites…” This definition is helpful as I recall the countless times I’ve been compelled to say “that which should not be said” in the presence of Whites. Since any word or statement that could potentially make White folks uncomfortable is “that which should not be said”, the stakes are perpetually high when whether or not I speak up from moment to moment can easily determine whether or not I am contributing to my own tokenism.
In my research on the subject (today), I came across an outstanding article by Lauren Lyons entitled “The Curious Conundrum Of The Code-Switching Token Teacher”. Yes, that title is everything and yes, you do need to stop reading this and go read something by another Black woman right now.  Don’t worry, I’ll be here when you get back.
* * * *

Impressive, right?

She basically conveyed the essence of what I am getting at with all of this, so I will just leave you with one more thought.

A real commitment to diversity must include, not only a willingness to be uncomfortable, but a recognition of the need to be. Discomfort should be seen as a positive indicator that the work of cross-cultural understanding may actually be taking place. Otherwise, tokenism will continue to be a much more likely outcome than diversity, whenever those with real differences attempt to come together in spite of them.

Token2

—Courtney Dowe lives at the Compersia community in Washington, DC.

 

 

 

 

None Dare Call It Tokenism

More Pictures from the Compersia Community

CompMorPix1

The beautiful roses of Tomorrowland, our old house.

CompMorPix2

Mere moments before Ash disappeared into the ductwork. A lot of cat food had fallen into the vent.

CompMorPix3

Meren and Julian fuel up for the Women’s March.

CompMorPix4

It’s amazing what a grocery store will throw out. Amazing and delicious.

CompMorPix5

A communard’s ransom in avocados rescued from the waste stream.

CompMorPix6

Steve and Trotsky, the newest cat to join our commune, compete for the title of “Fuzziest Communard”.

CompMorPix7

Pax tries unsuccessfully to name our new house at a naming party at our house warming party.

CompMorPix8

The real way we fund our commune.

CompMorPix9

While living in the nation’s capital has its drawbacks, it makes attending protests and marches super convenient.

 

 

More Pictures from the Compersia Community

Allowance versus Box of Money

There are not very many places that do secular income sharing.  But those that do come in two broad flavors.  For those of us who spend a lot of time talking about income sharing, these two different approaches are sometimes given the shorthand “Box of Money” and “Allowance”.

ABoM1

All full income sharing systems are in agreement about communalizing the vast majority of expenses:  Medical expenses, food, housing, clothing, education, transportation, costs connected with children, pets, various emergencies – these are all covered.  Everything that falls solidly onto the “needs” side of the sometimes vague needs vs wants divide is covered. It is the small things and the things at the needs/wants margin where we struggle.

Should i be paying for your beer (especially when i don’t drink)?  Should i be paying for your vacation to the beach?  At Twin Oaks we have “solved” this problem by giving our members an allowance which is typically around $100 per month.  You want to smoke cigarettes, you can have up to a $100 habit.  You have to be at the premier of the latest Marvel superhero movie, that is your discretionary call.  By giving people allowances, the commune avoids having to agree on a whole bunch of small, and oft divisive issues.

ABoM2

The more radical solution is the infamous “box of money”.  In a number of European communes, including some of the larger ones, there is a physical box of money and when you need some, you go take it.  Sometimes you need to write down what you took it for, in other places there is less concern about this.  But if you are using this approach, you are agreeing to have whatever conversations and consensus is necessary for everyone to trust each other enough to let them spend the money they need to spend to live the life they want to lead.

ABoM3

In the US, the existing “box of money” communes are smaller.  Compersia in DC, Sandhill in Missouri.  Allowance based communes include Twin Oaks, East Wind and Acorn, the largest three members of the FEC.  Although Acorn, with its anarchist orientation, straddles the boundary by empowering any member to spend up to $50 on anything for the community that they think is a good deal.  In the three years i lived there i did not hear anyone complain at a meeting that someone had misused this privilege.

ABoM4

Some of the trade offs between the “allowance” and “box of money” systems are obvious, but many we are still exploring. We know that using an “allowance” system makes room for differences of opinion to exist without being resolved or even seriously addressed. Is that a good thing because it saves time and preserves privacy or a bad thing because it doesn’t drive us towards mutual understanding and critical reflection? We know that using “box of money” system allows for a greater diversity of spending patterns and priorities among members. Is that a good thing because it more easily makes room for people from diverse backgrounds and in diverse situations or a bad thing because it doesn’t drive us always back into the communal economy, looking for ways to meet our needs with each other rather than with money? As more examples are created here in the States and as we build better bridges of communication across the Atlantic our understanding of the dynamics of egalitarian, cooperative economies can only flourish.

Allowance versus Box of Money

Compersia’s New Home

Folks at the Compersia Community were kind enough to send us pictures of their new home.  Here’s a few with comments from some of the community members.

CompNewHse1

As if in greeting, these trees burst into bloom the week that we moved in.

CompNewHse2

CompNewHse3

CompNewHse7

The kids enjoying a sleepover in the basement.

CompNewHse8

No FEC commune is complete without a Twin Oaks hammock.

CompNewHse9

Our yard backs up right to Rock Creek Park and we are visited nearly every day by a pack of deer and a pair of foxes making their rounds.

 

GPaul dances for baby Emma’s amusement.

Jenny in a pile of children.

Meren enjoys the climbable surfaces of the new house.

Barnaby and commune friends Gabi and Jenne face off at light saber point.

Games night at Compersia. Nerds of the world, unite!

Courtney performs at Art-o-matic, an area community arts event.

Compersia’s New Home

A Cornucopia of Communes

Pictures of most of the communities featured in Commune Life over the last year.  (All communes are in US states unless otherwise noted.)

Acorn, Mineral, VA:

acorn-family-portrait

Baltimore Free Farm, Baltimore, MD:

https://i1.wp.com/www.baltimorefreefarm.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Untitled-1-copy.jpg

Cambia, Louisa, VA:

Cambia 4

Compersia, Washington, DC:

First1

East Wind, Tecumseh, MO:

ews2

las Indias, Madrid, Spain:

LIWint5

Living Energy Farm, Louisa, VA:

LEFEH1

Oran MórSquires, MO:

Summer OM5a

Quercus (disbanded), Richmond, VA:

Porch music jam on our snazy palette-finished porch

Rainforest Lab, Forks, WA:

rfl

Sandhill Farm, Rutledge, MO:

Sandhill 1

Sycamore Farm, Arcadia, VA:

s-farm4

The Common Unity Project (TCUP),  Gitxsan Territory, Hazelton, BC (Canada):

tcup8

Twin Oaks, Louisa, VA:

ZK

 

 

 

A Cornucopia of Communes